The Mission and Vision of the Faculty of Applied Arts

As a constituent part of the University of Arts in Belgrade, the Faculty of Applied Arts, together with the faculties of music, fine arts and dramatic arts respectively, represents the foundation of higher education in the field of art in Serbia. Throughout their decades-long history, all these faculties have built a recognizable profile of their own and have occupied a special place in the entire educational system of Serbia, having formed generations of young people dedicated to art and to a creative approach to life in general.

The Faculty of Applied Arts of the University of Arts in Belgrade is an academic institution of higher education which has been realizing its mission through teaching, art, scholarly, educational and professional work and also through research in the fields of applied arts and design. The Faculty’s mission is to spread, improve and promote knowledge and learning, motivate creativity and support one’s wish for educating oneself and acquiring knowledge with a view to specific and measurable development, to promote art and to increase the total amount of knowledge in the widest context. With a view to achieving its mission, the Faculty does the following:

  • cherishes and constantly improves research in the field of applied arts, design, conservation and restoration, as well as scholarly and research work;
  • maintains the high level and flexibility of basic academic, master academic and doctoral academic studies according to international standards, keeping up with the global trends and initiatives and promoting a multidisciplinary approach, taking into account society’s needs for certain profiles of staff;
  • supports interdisciplinary and applied development and professional projects in cooperation with various national and international institutions and with the economic sector in our country and beyond, with a view to contributing to the general development and improvement of the environment.

As a specialized faculty, the Faculty of Applied Arts will endeavour to, through its research and educational activities, programmes and concept, become recognizable at the regional and international level as an art, professional and research institution of higher education. In order to achieve this vision, the Faculty will be doing the following:

  • cherishing creativity and knowledge;
  • maintaining and increasing students’ motivation for creative work, learning and further education;
  • supporting the inquisitive and research spirit of its students, teachers and collaborators;
  • cherishing and affirming openness and diversity.

 

The History of the Faculty of Applied Arts

1895

The first organized teaching activities in applied arts in Serbia began in 1895, only a month after the foundation of the Serbian School of Drawing and Painting by Kiril Kutlik, when, within the same school, an evening course for craftsmen was established with a view to “giving craftsmen an opportunity to exercise and improve their professional drawing skills, which are indispensable for a craftsman’s work and for cherishing good taste.” As an artist and pedagogue, Kutlik knew very well what the education of young craftsmen in the field of art meant for the improvement of crafts in Serbia and their promotion to the European level.

1900

After Kutlik’s death and by decision of the minister of national economy of 28 March 1900, the position of the School’s administrator was entrusted to artist Rista Vukanović and the Ministry retained its obligation to continue supporting the School financially. According to a School’s report of early June 1900, 65 students of various vocations were enrolled in the craftsmen’s course. Having purchased the School of Drawing and Painting from Kutlik’s widow, Rista Vukanović continued with his predecessor’s work in the field of the promotion of teaching activities in the field of applied arts and crafts in Belgrade.

1905

As the time elapsed, the changed cultural circumstances at the start of the 20th century proved favourable for the foundation of the first specialized pedagogical institution of its kind in Serbia, which was opened in Belgrade in 1905, under the name of the School for Arts and Crafts, with a view to artistically enriching and developing certain crafts. The aforesaid Rista Vukanović, an already well-known artist, was at the helm of the new School, contributing a lot to the promotion of art education in Serbia.

However, in practice, the teaching activities in this newly-formed school were mostly confined to fine arts, particularly the art of painting and sculpture. The School did not succeed in forming even a graphics workshop and, despite the fact that the distinguished designer and artist Dragutin Inkiostri Medenjak was an honorary teacher there for years, the School did not manage to expand its field of activities to include applied arts as well. Inkiostri, an exceptional artist in the field of applied arts, persistently endeavoured for years to spread new concepts in this sphere of art. Many of his ideas were too progressive for his time as he strove to promote his patriarchal setting to the European level of understanding of art.

1919

The School for Arts and Crafts existed until 1918 and, after the end of the Great War, resumed its work under the name of the Royal Art School in Belgrade, which, in addition to the former school’s premises, also took over its entire inventory, the library and numerous plaster models. In the period from 1919 to 1937, the new school formed painters and sculptors, as well as teachers for secondary schools in central Serbia, but also in Vojvodina, Macedonia, Montenegro and partly for Bosnia and Herzegovina.

1938

The idea of the foundation of a secondary school for applied arts emerged somewhat simultaneously with the establishment of the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade (1937) and thus the former was opened as early as in the year to follow, namely in 1938. Those who were most deserving for the establishment of the new school were its teachers-to-be, namely the sculptor Milan Nedeljković, the architect Đorđe Krekić, the painter Ivan Tabaković and the sculptor Mihailo Tomić. Later, they were joined by other teachers, mostly from Belgrade and Zagreb. Having been founded on the eve of the Second World War, this school did not have a chance for long existence and continuous work and the four wartime years was a period in which the school barely made its ends meet.

1948

Only three years after the end of the war, the Secondary School for Applied Arts ceased to exist, or rather, it was promoted to the level of an academy. Its former students successively graduated and moved to the newly-founded Academy of Applied Arts, which began its work in the autumn of 1948. Apart from the former secondary school students, the right to enroll at the Academy, following a passed entrance examination, was provided to students of other secondary schools of art as well, and even to grammar school students, and also to exceptionally gifted people without previous education.

Thus, in the period from 1948 to 1951, the former secondary school students and new students enrolled at the Academy attended the same classes. Some of them later became eminent teachers at the Academy of Applied Arts.

As soon as it was founded, the Academy faced numerous problems and difficulties, which it was not always able to anticipate or to resolve quickly. Housed in the dilapidated building of the former School for Arts and Crafts, which was built as early as in the first half of the previous century, the Academy was unable to meet the requirements of modern teaching in an institution of higher education. The teaching staff was insufficient, recruited mostly among Belgrade artists, who had been affirmed through their works of art or as school teachers. A very important role in the first decades of the Academy’s work was played by its then chancellor, Branko Šotra - a distinguished Serbian graphic artist who remained a leading person of the Academy throughout his life and immensely contributed to the Academy’s development and affirmation.

In a country which was just recently devastated by the war and which faced numerous hardships daily, the Academy sought its true place amidst the trends of cultural, economic and industrial transformation of society. Its primary task was to educate modern experts and enable them to improve the general art culture of their region, as well as to contribute to the appearance of industrial products, to the modernization of trade and to the visual and spatial development of man’s immediate working and living environment.

On the circumstances in which the Academy was active in the first decades of its work, one of its distinguished professors, Pavle Vasić, Ph.D., wrote the following: “It was a very difficult and strenuous journey - connecting art and industry - but not everything depended on the Academy, on its orientation and goals. Other difficulties emerged, especially at the moment when the incompetent and undereducated industrial staff had to be replaced. We may as well say that each expert position in this industry put up some resistance to being conquered, even in the cases when the acceptance of new, professional trained staff would evidently prove beneficial. The emerging resistance was, however, a purely subjective one and thus difficult to deal with. Besides, it was necessary to exert influence on the development of certain awareness, not only within the industry itself or within its management, but also in the wider public. It is understandable that, in time, the Academy’s orientation changed and evolved towards some new, altered goals, which set themselves along with the intensive development of our society and its needs.”

In the twenty-five years of its fruitful activity, the Academy developed into a recognized Yugoslav institution of higher education, the graduates of which subsequently achieved significant results in the regions they came from, but also in all the then republics and provinces of our country. Thus, the Academy contributed to the development and promotion of applied arts and design in the whole territory of the former Yugoslavia.

As regards its internal organization, it was from the very beginning that the Academy adhered to some essential principles which applied to similar schools worldwide, taking, however, some specific local circumstances and needs into account. At the beginning of its work, it had eight departments - for interior architecture, for decorative plastic, for decorative painting, for applied graphics, for ceramics, for textile, for stage design and for costume design. The principal applied courses were taught by a group of teachers who had laid the foundation of this school in the first place and directed its professional orientation towards some specific objectives. Those teachers were not only excellent pedagogues, but also exceptional and distinguished artists with high artistic reputation, which guaranteed a serious and thorough approach to the realization of the set goals: architects Đorđe Krekić, Momčilo Belobrk and Aleksandar Sekulić (Department of Interior Architecture), sculptor Radeta Stanković (Department of Decorative Sculpture), painter Ivan Tabaković and Sergije Lebedev, Ph.D. (Department of Ceramics), painters Vasa Pomorišac, Vinko Grdan and Anton Huter (Department of Decorative Painting), painters Mihailo S. Petrov and Matija Zlamalik (Department of Graphics), painter Milenko Šerban (Department of Stage Design), costume designer Milica Babić (Department of Costume Design), Ivan Tabaković and Iva Vrinjanin (Department of Textile). Besides the aforesaid, the same group of the Academy’s first teachers also included those holding theoretical and practical courses, namely: Stanislava Kolarić, Ph.D. (History of Art), Pavle Vasić, Ph.D. (History of Costume), Ivan Lučev (Anatomy Drawing), Branko Šotra (Graphics), Jefto Perić (The Nude) and Dragutin Mitrinović (Textile Design). For years, professor Pavle Vasić, Ph.D., taught the Fine Arts Elements course, whereas professor Dragoslav Stojanović Sip, an eminent artist who left a deep mark in the work of this institution, taught the Fundamentals of Visual Design course.

It should be emphasized that contacts with abroad grew in intensity from year to year, so they would have considerably influenced the circumstances in our country, especially when it came to the development of applied arts and their involvement in modern development trends in the West.

The course taken by the Academy from its foundation onwards can be followed through its annual exhibitions, namely those in 1951, 1953, 1955, 1959, 1961, 1963 and 1965 respectively, and also through the exhibitions of graduate works in 1970 and 1972 respectively. It could be said that the Academy’s aspirations to meet its role in the industrialization epoch as well as possible increased.

Exhibition catalogues and critical reviews played a certain part in the process of explaining what applied arts are, what they serve for and how they can benefit us. Thus applied arts found their way to the wider social strata, namely the working class, and embarked on the refinement of their taste.

1973

A new phase in the school’s development began in 1973, when the Academy was reorganized, changing its name to the Faculty of Applied Arts. Some organizational changes occurred as well, the then departments being replaced by the following ones: I - ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN, II - CERAMICS AND GLASS, III - STAGE DESIGN, IV - SCULPTURE, V - GRAPHICS, VI - COSTUME DESIGN, VII - PAINTING and VIII -TEXTILE. On that occasion, a more complex and richer programme of teaching was adopted (with 30 classes per week) and teaching was organized in special studios with a more modern approach to certain branches of applied arts.

As early as in the mid-1960s, the process of gradual rejuvenation of the teaching staff began as a new generation of teachers, mainly former Academy graduates, had emerged. These were painters Rajko Nikolić and Živojin Kovačević (Painting), Krsta Andrejević (Painting Techniques) Aleksandar Tomašević (Monumental Painting), Nevenka Petrović and Branislav Subotić (Textile), Dušan Ristić (Stage Costume), Anđelka Slijepčević (Contemporary Fashion Design), Zora Davidović (History of Costume Design), Mila Rajković and Aleksa Čelebonović (History of Art), Božidar Džmerković (Graphics), Bogdan Kršić (Printmaking and Book Design), Miodrag Vujačić Mirski (Painting), Stjepan Fileki (Elements of Calligraphy), architect Dragutin Tavrić (Styles in Interior Architecture), Dragoljub Kažić (Photography) and Bogoljub Teofanović (Industrial Design). They were soon joined by Gradimir Petrović (Painting), Đorđe Rosić (Ceramics), Vojislav Vujisić, Miodrag Živković, Nebojša Mitrić and Nandor Glid (Sculpture), Miloš Ćirić (Communications in Graphics), Borivoj Likić (Posters), Ljubodrag Marinković Penkin (Painting), Ljubodrag Janković Jale (The Nude), Borivoje Rakić (Drawing and Painting), Živorad Kukić (Stage Design), Siniša Vuković (Interior Architecture), Vladimir Todorović (Painting), Branislav Makeš (Graphics), Aleksandar Ajzinberg (Styles in Architecture), etc.

In the years to follow, the Faculty attained its full maturity and employed some new eminent artists, scholars and art experts, namely: Nikola Kuzmanović (Descriptive Geometry), Mirjana Isaković and Branislav Stajević (Ceramics), Aleksandar Pajvančić Aleks (Communications in Graphics and Spatial Graphics), Slobodan Đuričković (Drawing and Painting), Aleksandar Dodig (Calligraphy), Vladimir Rozić, Ph.D., Branko Vujović, Ph.D., and Milanka Todić, Ph.D. (History of Art), Ljiljana Žegarac (Contemporary Fashion Design), Danka Dokić (Drawing and Painting), Miodrag Bajić (Anatomy Drawing), Ratko Lalić (Drawing and Painting), etc.

Prepared by R. Ć.

 

Organizational Scheme

Study Programs

Accreditation of the Higher Education Institution and Its Study Programs

On 22 May 2015, the Accreditation and Quality Verification Board issues certificated accrediting the Faculty of Applied Arts according to the higher education institution accreditation standards and also accrediting the undergraduate and master academic studies’ respective study programs within the field of Art, area: Applied Arts and Design:

OAS4 - Applied Arts

OAS4 - Design

OAS4 - Conservation and Restoration

MAS1 - Applied Arts

MAS1 - Design

MAS1 - Conservation and Restoration

Accredited Doctoral Studies

On 3 July 2013, the Accreditation Board issued a decision accrediting the Belgrade Faculty of Applied Arts’ doctoral studies’ program entitled Applied Arts and Design.

On 30 April 2020, the Accreditation Board issued a decision accrediting the Belgrade Faculty of Applied Arts’ doctoral studies’ program entitled Applied Arts and Design.

The teaching activities at the Faculty of Applied Arts in Belgrade have been organized as 4-year undegraduate (basic) academic studies, 1-year diploma academic studies - master studies and 3-year doctoral academic studies respectively and have been structured through the activity of the following modules:

  • Graphic Design
  • Interior and Furniture Design
  • Industrial Design
  • Applied Graphics
  • Applied Painting
  • Conservation and Restoration
  • Applied Sculpture
  • Ceramics
  • Stage Design
  • Costume Design
  • Textile Design
  • Department of Social Sciences and Humanities

Study Program: Applied Arts

Undergraduate (Basic) Academic Studies at the Faculty of Applied Arts

The study programe of the undergraduate academic studies in Applied Arts belongs to the educational and artistic field of Art, area: Applied Arts and Design.

The academic title acquired upon graduation is the Bachelor of Applied Arts and it is abbreviated as B.A.A.

A more detailed specification of the acquired expert competences and the awarded qualification has been defined in the respective diploma supplements for the nine streams, i.e. specialized fields: Applied Painting, Applied Sculpture, Ceramics, Stage Design, Stage Costume Design, Contemporary Fashion Design, Printmaking and Book Design, Photography and Animation.

A student is deemed to have finished the studies upon earning at least 240 ECTS and upon fulfilling all the obligations stipulated by the study program. The study program does not envisage a final project.

An academic year is divided into two terms, each consisting of 15 working weeks, whereas 1 ECTS totals 30 hours of workload.

The study program structure includes all the three categories of courses in the following respective percentages: art courses 56.90%, theory and art courses 25.79% and social sciences and humanities 17.30%. As the categorization of the courses has been narrowed down as compared to the contents, nature and character of the required subject matter, the category of theory and art courses also includes other courses, such as: Tailoring, Technology of Ceramics 1 and 2, Technology of Textile, etc. As there is no precise category for these courses, they have been included in a kindred one.

The program structure encompasses election modules, general compulsory courses and electives. By choosing a module, a student opts for one of the nine available streams:

Applied Painting

Applied Sculpture

Ceramics

Stage Costume Design

Stage Design

Contemporary Fashion Design

Printmaking and Book Design

Photography

Animation

Although the students opt for a stream as early as when enrolling at the studies, the study program’s modular structure and the flexible rules of the studies allow students to opt for another stream or study program during the studies. The transfers from other study programs/streams and the expansions of a study program have been regulated by the unified Studies Regulations.

The general compulsory courses serve to provide theoretical and practical artistic knowledge and skills. The general compulsory courses include an integrated group of pedagogical courses of 18 ECTS in total, so students are enabled to expand their knowledge in this way as well and acquire competences for pedagogical work in the field of art and education.

The elective courses enable students to expand their knowledge according to their personal affinities and provide them with some new experience resulting from work with students attending other study programs or modules. The electives have been defined by the study program’s curriculum.

The contents of the main art courses provide students with practical and artistic knowledge and skills, whereas the contents of other courses provide them with artistic, theoretical, theoretical and artistic, professional or methodical knowledge. The students are thereby encouraged to show creativity in their artistic practice and are introduced to the specific technical and technological features of the vocation they have chosen. By mastering various contents, the students of applied arts become acquainted with the historical, theoretical and contemporary framework of this profession at the higher education level.

The basic forms of teaching stipulated by the curriculum are the following: lectures and exercises, as active teaching, and independent practical work of students, which has been defined as “other classes”. Teaching activities in art courses are conducted at the Faculty’s premises, in studios or in specialized work premises. Lectures can be held ex cathedra or through individual teaching. The lectures are accompanied by exercises and, by working on practical artistic assignments, projects or research topics, the students master the stipulated program contents.

The lectures and exercises within the art courses, aimed at making students develop practical skills in art, have been based on continuous, personal contact between a student and their teacher/collaborator and represent the most important part of the studies, which includes active teaching and the obligatory independent practical work on the realization and presentation of assignments/projects in the Faculty’s studios, workshops and laboratories, but also some completely independent work of students outside the Faculty.

The assignments of the students related to the exercises may include work on practical art assignments or projects (execution of an artistic assignment in specific materials and technique, digital execution in 3D/2D software, etc.), presentations, seminar papers, graphic design works, essays, term projects, etc., in line with the course requirements, each student activity being monitored, directed and evaluated during the teaching process and the success achieved upon the execution of the task being assessed. The number of credits earned in the pre-examination period and at the examination itself determines the final mark expressing a student’s success in a course.

The studies of applied arts, as an academic and intellectual activity, are manifested through the creation of artefacts, mostly intended for cultural consumption. Therefore, the studies of applied arts represent a professional response to the creative potentials of individuals. The acquired competences and the creative and practical skills of artists in the field of applied arts are becoming increasingly more indispensable today, as the world we live in is becoming increasingly more complex and sophisticated and, as such, it requires more complex solutions and results.

The program has been formulated on the basis of the years-long tradition of art education at the Faculty of Applied Arts and on the basis of the contemporary theoretical and practical achievements in this field. The program’s purpose is the formation of a modern, creative, artistically and technically educated, responsible and professionally specialized person, who is competent and qualified for creative and artistic work in the field of applied arts.

By successfully completing this study program, a student acquires the following academic title: a bachelor of applied arts, which title enables them to, in accordance with the profile of their choice, earn their own living or pursue further education or professional training by applying the acquired knowledge and skills and their creative abilities.

Study Program: Design

The study program of the undergraduate academic studies in Design belongs to the educational and artistic field of Art, area: Applied Arts and Design.

The objective of this study program is to provide students with the relevant knowledge, develop the apt personal characteristics, master creative skills and thus prepare themselves for performing the vocation of their choice, for further education and for personal and professional development, as well as for pedagogical activities in primary and secondary education.

The academic title acquired upon graduation is the Bachelor of Design and it is abbreviated as B.Des. A more detailed specification of the acquired expert competences and the awarded qualification has been defined in the respective diploma supplements for the four streams, i.e. specialized fields:

  • Graphic Design
  • Industrial Design
  • Interior and Furniture Design
  • Textile Design

A student is deemed to have finished the studies upon earning at least 240 ECTS and upon fulfilling all the obligations stipulated by the study program. The study program does not envisage a final project.

An academic year is divided into two terms, each consisting of 15 working weeks, whereas 1 ECTS totals 30 hours of workload.

The program’s structure includes compulsory and elective courses, which have been classified into modules, general compulsory courses and electives.

Each module is represented with 170 ECTS in total, in each of the four year of studies, and by choosing them a student opts for one of the four available streams. Within each module, the principal art courses characteristic of that stream, i.e. specialized field of art, have been defined. The modular structure and the flexible rules of the studies allow students to opt for another stream or study program during the studies or to expand their program of studies by choosing an additional module. The transfers from other study programs/streams and the expansions of a study program have been regulated by the unified Studies Regulations.

The general compulsory courses, represented with 58 ECTS, serve to provide theoretical and practical artistic knowledge and skills. The general compulsory courses include an integrated group of three pedagogical courses of 18 ECTS in total, so students are enabled to expand their knowledge in this way as well and acquire competences for pedagogical work in the field of art and education.

The elective courses, represented with 12 ECTS, have been positioned as three electives at the 3rd and 4th year of studies and enable students to expand their knowledge according to their personal affinities, providing them with some new experience resulting from work with students attending other study program or modules. The electives have been defined by the study programe’s curriculum.

Each course spans two semesters and has a defined structure described in its specification, which includes: a stipulated number of ECTS credits, prerequisites for enrollment, goal, outcome, theoretical and practical contents, reading list, a weekly number of active tuition classes and other classes of compulsory practical work, methods of instruction and methods of continual assessment of knowledge. A detailed description of the credit award and final assessment process has been defined in the Studies Regulations. 

The study program enrollment prerequisites are the following: graduation from a four-year secondary school or from a three-year secondary school with the differential examination passed, as well as a passed test of affinities and skills accompanied by appropriate ranking on the entrance list. At the very examination itself, the candidates opt for one of the four available streams - modules, on the basis of which they decide which examination to take.

Design is a creative activity aimed at attaining various qualities of objects, processes, services and their systems. As the central factor of innovative humanization of technology and as an added value to products and facilities, systems or services, design occupies an important place in many processes of development in society and represents a special value in current cultural and economic exchange.

The program has been formulated on the basis of the years-long tradition of art education at the Faculty of Applied Arts and on the basis of the contemporary theoretical and practical achievements in the field of design. The programs’ purpose is the formation of a modern, creative, artistically and technically educated, responsible and professionally specialized person - designer, who is competent and qualified for creative and artistic work in the field of design. By successfully completing this study program, a student acquires the following academic title: a bachelor of design, which title enables them to, in accordance with the profile of their choice, earn their own living or pursue further education or professional training by applying the acquired knowledge and skills and their creative abilities.

Study Program: Conservation and Restoration            

The Conservation and Restoration study program of the undergraduate academic studies belongs to the educational and artistic field of Art, area: Applied Arts and Design, and contains all the elements established by the law.

This study program is aimed at providing students with creative skills and preparing them for the profession of their own choice and also at enabling them to acquire the knowledge which is necessary for the activity in the field of protection of cultural heritage. Other goals of this study program include further education and professional development, as well as capacitating students for pedagogical work in primary and secondary education.

The academic and scholarly title acquired upon finishing the studies is the Bachelor of Conservation and Restoration, which is abbreviated as BA in Conservation and Restoration. A more detailed specification of the acquired expert competences and the awarded qualifications have been defined in the diploma supplements for one of the two available streams:

  • Conservation and Restoration of Paintings and Works of Art on Paper
  • Conservation and Restoration of Sculptures and Archaeological Artefacts

A student is deemed to have finished the studies upon earning at least 240 ECTS and upon fulfilling all the obligations stipulated by the study program. The study program does not envisage a final project.

An academic year is divided into two terms, each consisting of 15 working weeks, whereas 1 ECTS totals 30 hours of workload.

The program structure consists of modules, which encompass general compulsory courses and electives. Within each module, the principal art courses characteristic of that stream have been defined. The modular structure and the flexible rules of the studies allow students to opt for another stream or study program. The transfers from other study programs/streams and the expansions of a study program have been regulated by the Faculty’s unified Studies Regulations.

The general compulsory courses include an integrated group of three pedagogical courses of 18 ECTS in total, so students are enabled to expand their knowledge in this way as well and acquire competences for pedagogical work in the field of art and education.

The elective courses, represented with 14 ECTS, have been positioned as electives at the 3rd and 4th

year of studies and enable students to expand their knowledge according to their personal affinities, providing them with some new experience resulting from work with students attending other study programs or modules. The electives have been defined by the study programs curriculum.

Each course spans two semesters and has a defined structure described in its specification, which includes: a stipulated number of ECTS credits, prerequisites for enrollment, goal, outcome, theoretical and practical contents, reading list, a weekly number of active tuition classes and other classes of compulsory practical work, methods of instruction and methods of continual assessment of knowledge. A detailed description of the credit award and final assessment process has been defined in the Studies Regulations. 

The study program enrollment prerequisites are the following: graduation from a four-year secondary school or from a three-year secondary school with the differential examination passed, as well as a passed test of affinities and skills accompanied by appropriate ranking on the entrance list. At the very examination itself, the candidates opt for one of the two available streams - modules, on the basis of which they decide which examination to take.

The Conservation and Restoration study program educates future conservators-restorers - profiled experts who, after graduation, have the knowledge, skills and understanding required for acting with a view to the protection of cultural heritage.

Modern conservation and restoration has become a symbiosis of art and science, expanding the field of its activity to all the types of cultural assets: architectural and monumental heritage, the natural environment, archaeological sites, museum artefacts, archives and library materials, film archives and intangible heritage. The increasing involvement of science in the conservation practice results from the need for applying precise methods for the detection and elimination of causes of the deterioration of works of art and for finding reliable methods for repairing them. Therefore, it is necessary to insist that experts in conservation and restoration should acquire a wide interdisciplinary vocational education in order that harmony between art and science be maintained within the profession.

The purpose of this study program is the acquisition of the required competences and professional qualifications for the performance of conservation and restoration activities, i.e. for being engaged in the protection of cultural heritage. By successfully completing this study program, a student acquires the following academic title: a bachelor of conservation and restoration, which title enables them to, in accordance with the profile of their choice, earn their own living or pursue further education or professional training by applying the acquired knowledge and skills and their creative abilities.

 

Number of students and teachers

Students

The accreditation stipulates the following enrollments:

OAS4 - Applied Arts - 82 students

OAS4 - Design - 49 students

OAS4 - Conservation and Restoration - 14 students

MAS1 - Applied Arts - 82 students

MAS1 - Design - 49 students

MAS1 - Conservation and Restoration - 14 students

DAS1 - Applied Arts and Design - 30 students

In the academic year 2021/22

The maximum number of students in accordance with the accreditation - 818 students

 

Teachers and staff

In the academic year 2021/2022, at the Faculty of Applied Arts:

teachers and collaborators - 137

The planned total number of employees is 150

34 FPU program

Picture 33 - Photo Archives of the Faculty of Applied Arts                                                                     

 

Organization - the Faculty Offices

The Library

The Library of the Faculty of Applied Arts is an ancillary teaching organizational unit which collects, preserves and lends the library materials studied at the Faculty. Its funds cover all the teaching areas and, along with professional periodicals, it also treasures many reference publications of the general civilization and cultural character. Thus the Library represents an information base for education and research in the applied arts in general. It is a deposit library for publications in all the media which are issued by the Faculty and is also in charge of all the activities stipulated by the Law on Library Activities. Upon the formation of an electronic catalogue, the Library joined Serbia’s Virtual Library program - COBISS thus becoming an integral part of the library and information system of universities and libratiesin Serbia. The Library originated from the book fund of the former School of Applied Arts, which had 420 books back in 1948, whereas now it boasts some 22,000 units, more than 9,000 of which are monographic publications, whereas the remaining items are periodicals. A special asset of the Library is the numerous exhibition catalogues and, ever since studies for a magister’s (master’s) degree were introduced in 1974, the Library has been treasuring all the master theses defended at the Faculty, doctoral dissertations in the field of applied arts and a considerable number of slides and other document. The Library users are primarily Faculty students and teachers, but also the students of other faculties and schools from all over the country, cultural officials, artists, scholars, experts and those engaged in the art of theatre, cinema or television.

Administrative Office

The Faculty’s Administrative Office is in charge of the following:

- legal and general affairs

The legal and general affairs include tasks related to the drawing up of the Faculty’s legal documents and to the application of the law, the Faculty’s Statute and other general acts of the University and the Faculty in order that the latter should act according to the law, staff-related issues, issues related to the work of professional authorities, administrative authorities and management authorities, record keeping and office work, assignments related to the Faculty’s cooperation with international associations, organizations, foreign and national universities and faculties, scholarly and research organizations and institutions, as well as tasks related to the Faculty’s promotion and positioning within the academic, artistic, scientific, research and general setting.

 - student and teaching affairs

The student affairs include tasks related to enrollment and the fulfillment of attendance requirements, to lectures, examinations and to student issues at all the study levels.

 - financial and accounting issues

The financial and accounting issues include tasks related to the regular and proper keeping of business books and information necessary for the administration of the Faculty’s financial and property issues. The tasks include the preparation of financial plans and of reports on the implementation of such plans, the drawing up of periodical accounts and final statements, the calculation of salaries and other earnings and other assignments as well.

- technical service issues

The technical tasks include those related to building maintenance, which are aimed at securing proper technical functioning and hygiene in the Faculty’s premises and in the yard, as well as the maintenance and improvement of the fire protection system, the safety and health at work system and the PTT network.

 

Current Situation - Description of the Faculty of Applied Arts’ Current Buildings and Premises

The teaching activities at the Faculty take place at four locations:

Location 1  

At 4 Kralja Petra street

Location 2

At 29 Kosančićev venac street, in the University of Arts’ Rectorate building

Location 3

At 15 Karađorđeva street

Location 4

At 2 Slobodanke Danke Savić street

Note: The presentation of the current premises of the Faculty of Applied Arts has been enclosed with the competition documentation. The competition covers only the construction of new premises at 15 Karađorđeva street, namely at Location 3.

Location 1 current situation

The following buildings are located at 4 Kralja Petra street:

  • The Faculty of Applied Arts’ Dean’s Office building
  • The Secretariat and administrative offices

Departments:

  • Applied Painting
  • Conservation and Restoration
  • Ceramics
  • Stage Design

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Picture 34   Location 1               4 Kralja Petra street

Around 1836, as part of the Princess Ljubica’s Residence complex, an ancillary building was constructed, which was subsequently to house the Art School. The building belonged to the former Town Gate (Varoš kapija) area, which, at that time, was the center of the political and social life in the Principality of Serbia. The building was a timber frame structure, which was typical of the early 19th century architecture in Belgrade.

Throughout history, the building changed its purpose many times. Prince Mihailo Obrenović (Princess Ljubica’s son) resided there until 1842. The building subsequently housed the offices of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Education and Justice, then the First Belgrade Grammar School and finally the School of Arts and Crafts, which eventually became the Academy of Fine Arts. Today it is the building of the Faculty of Applied Arts.

The present building is a cultural asset and is of wider interest to the Protection Office; it has been planned for preservation and further improvement. The building’s present dimensions and volume, as well as the number of floors (ground floor + first floor + loft) will be preserved.

The building is currently undergoing adaptations within the present dimensions and volume of its roof, with a view to improvement of the conditions for use.

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Picture 35   Cultural monument: the Art School building at 4 Kralja Petra street

 source: ZZSKBGD (City of Belgrade’s Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments)                               

The current gross construction surface of all the structures within the Location 1 complex is approximately 2240 m².* (*information from the Detailed Regulation Plan).

Structure Status:

The location is covered by the Detailed Regulation Plan for the Kosančićev venac neighbourhood (Official Journal of the City of Belgrade no. 37/2007). According to the planning documentation, the present purpose of the structure - the Faculty of Applied Arts’ premises - is to be preserved.

The Faculty of Applied Arts’ structure at 4 Kralja Petra street is to retain its present volume, with no possible further additional construction or superstructures. The Faculty of Applied Arts’ structure at 12 Zadarska street is also to be preserved, but it is possible to construct an attic or a loft along the structure’s horizontal line up to the level of the roof of the adjacent building at 10 Zadarska street, with the present cornice retained.

The plan defines a construction plot of the public building land (O2) for the Faculty’s purposes, within the boundaries of the Faculty’s present yard, of some 1,500 m2 in surface. The plot originated from a division of the cadastral plot in 1998. The plot’s floor area ratio is S = 46% and its lot coverage is I = 1.2. The ground-floor structure in the yard will be removed from the plot.

Location 2

The following is located at 29 Kosančićev venac street, namely in the University of Arts’ Rectorate building:

  • the Library of the Faculty of Applied Arts

Department: Applied Graphics

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Picture 36    Location 2         29 Kosančićev venac street

 

The Financial Directorate building was build on the eve of 1930. It later housed the Institute for Geophysics and today it is the building of the University of Arts’ Rectorate. The building has been conceived in the style of academism, with some interwar Art Nouveau elements, and is a representative structure within the area.

The present building is a cultural asset and is of wider interest to the Protection Office; it has been planned for preservation and further improvement.

Structure Status:

In accordance with the Amendments to the Detailed Regulation Plan for the Kosančićev venac neighbourhood, for the section of the block between the following streets: Karađorđeva, Velike stepenice and Kosančićev venac streets, the City Municipality of Stari grad (Official Journal of the City of Belgrade, no. 76/21), the current horizontal and vertical dimensions of the building is to be preserved, except in the part of the terrace towards the pedestrian promenade, in the north-west part of the building, where additional construction is allowed. In the context of securing functional access to the building from 91.00 meters of altitude, a structure with a flat roof in the function of a terrace is to be added, according to the construction lines (which constitute the construction zone), with a floor area of max. 250 m2 of the gross construction surface.

The construction zone is shown on Graphic Enclosure no. 3 – “The Regulation and Levelling Plan with the Analytical and Geodetic Marking Elements” P 1:500.

In addition to the main access to the building from Kosančićev venac street, a pedestrian access from the planned public surface, at the level of 91.00 meters of altitude, is enabled. It is permitted that the additionally constructed part of the building, within the contact zone towards the public area of the pedestrian promenade at the level of 91.00 meters of altitude, should serve for commercial purposes.

The planned purpose of the area in which the structure to be added to the building is located, within the contact zone towards the public area of the pedestrian promenade at the level of 91.00 meters of altitude, is in the function of the main purpose of the University of Arts (promotional activities of the artistic work of the University of Arts’ students and teachers – gallery and exhibition premises and concert venue and club premises) and commercial facilities in the function of the basic purpose is allowed as well. In the construction of the additional structure, the historical and visual value of the Rectorate building should be observed.

In terms of its architecture, structure and function, the planned facility should reflect the period in which it was built and should be executed in such a way as to form a harmonious unit together with the Rectorate building. Considering the spatial disposition of the planned structure and the view commanded onto it from the river, one should pay special attention to the design of its façade – to the architectural articulation, materialization and the execution of colours.

                                                                                                                                

Location 3

The following departments are located at 15 Karađorđeva street:

  • Applied Graphics
  • Applied Painting

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Picture 37      Location 3              15, Karađorđeva street

The Faculty of Applied Arts’ building was built as a provisional structure at the site of the former “Kragujevac” Hotel building.

Structure status - all the structures currently located on this plot are intended for demolition

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Picture 38 - 15 Karađorđeva street:, in 2021                                                            Picture 39 - 15 Karađorđeva street:, in 2021

©P.U                                                                                                                                                                          ©P.U

 

Location no. 3 is covered by the architectural and urban planning competition.

 

Location 4

The following departments are located at 2 Slobodanke Danke Savić street:

  • Interior and Furniture Design
  • Industrial Design
  • Applied Sculpture
  • Costume Design
  • Textile Design

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Picture 40           Location 4              29 Slobodanke Danke Savić street

 

Structure Status:

  • the current structure, situated along Slobodanke Danke Savić street, retains its current number of floors; the number of floors established in the field is: ground floor + three floors + loft, so, with this plan, it is defined as the number of floors to be retained.
  • the current structure, situated along Slobodanke Danke Savić street - the number of floors: ground floor (and ground floor + first floor in one section) can undergo additional construction up to the following number of floors: ground floor + first floor
  • the current structure - the number of floors: ground floor + first floor can undergo additional construction up to the following number of floors: ground floor + two floors

Function: the building’s current purpose is to be retained

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Picture 41 - the Faculty of Applied Arts’ Photo Archives